Monday, April 25, 2016

Quoting Arizona

Come check out my updated page of quotes about Arizona! I’ve discovered dozens of old titles about my state on Google Books, including some from the 1800s when it was only yet a territory. There are such vibrant descriptions of the land, weather, and culture I couldn’t help but spend nearly all my free time these past couple of months reading and searching and harvesting! And I’m not even close to done with them all, but I’m just too thrilled and can’t wait to share.

Arizona Territory Seal 1863
Seal of the Territory of Arizona, 1863
Source: History of the Pacific States of North
America, Vol XII: Arizona and New Mexico,
by Hubert Howe Bancroft, 1888.
Modified by TG, 2016, using Aviary.
The newly revised page now has about 275 quotes and has leaped to the second largest page on the entire site, after the page of quotations about quotations.

You know what they say: Eat local, quote local. Several well-known locals are represented — Barbara Kingsolver, Zane Grey, Erma Bombeck, Don Dedera, Alice Cooper, Stephenie Meyer, Diana Gabaldon, etc, plus lesser-known but equally eloquent past and present Arizona residents, traveling writers, and novelists too.

When I was much younger, I used to think our desert was so ugly in comparison to most other places that were green and lush and alive and had less glaring light. But I’ve really come around to the special beauty of the rocks and cacti and sparser greens, especially after getting into photography in high school. And we really do have gorgeous sunrises, sunsets, clouds, and amazing springtime wildflowers and blossoms. Yes, the heat can be a little harsh but we get used to it. Politics aside (don’t get me started), I do love my home state and I truly hope you enjoy browsing the quotes as much as I enjoyed finding them. I will continue to add more as I find time for literary harvests. You can read the quotes here: www.quotegarden.com/arizona.html. Full-size versions of the below photos are available on Tumblr; see link below each photo.

Arizona quote from The Quote Garden on photo of Superstition Mountains
{view photo full size}
“Land of extremes. Land of contrasts. Land of surprises.
Land of contradictions.... That is Arizona.” ~State Guide, 1940
Photo: Lost Dutchman, Superstition Mountains, Arizona by
Terri Guillemets, 2010. Editing app: cameran collage
Arizona cactus quote from The Quote Garden on photo taken hiking Squaw Peak
{view photo full size}
“You know you’re an Arizona native when you
know every cactus by its face.” ~Terri Guillemets
Photo: View of Phoenix, Arizona from Squaw Peak, 2011,
by Terri Guillemets. Editing app: cameran collage
Arizona colors quote from The Quote Garden on photo of Phoenix sunrise
{view photo full size}
“If you thrill to vivid beauty
Go where the world was drawn;
At dawn watch the glowing palette
God wiped His brushes on.”
~Grace Shattuck Bail, 1968
Photo: Sunrise in Phoenix, Arizona, 2009, by Terri Guillemets.
(Poet is referring to the Painted Desert) Editing app: Fontmania
Arizona springtime cactus quote from The Quote Garden on Phoenix North Mountain photo
{view photo full size}
“Even the ugliest cactus plant becomes a thing of radiant beauty when
it comes under the miracle touch of spring.” ~Raymond Carlson, 1965
Photo: North Mountain, Phoenix, Arizona, 2010, by
Terri Guillemets. Editing app: cameran collage
Arizona quote from The Quote Garden on photo taken at North Mountain in Phoenix
{view photo full size}
“Almost everyone in the world knows something about
Arizona, and some of it is even true.” ~Jim Turner, 2011
Photo: North Mountain Nature Trail, Phoenix, Arizona,
2010, by Terri Guillemets. Editing app: PathOn

“Arizona mesas are arid and barren—broad plateaus of wild, rugged, waterless deserts; the marvelous mountains are rugged, ragged, rough, red, and rude—barren to summit and bleak to every sense. The shadeless mesquite is not essentially handsome or inviting; the valde-verde tree, with its mockery of leafless branches, is not an object of delight; the clouds of hot alkali dust that arise are not agreeable to eye or taste... the numerous varieties of the grotesque cactus, from the little cotton-like bulb of the smallest that hugs the earth, to the monstrous columnar fungus that outlines itself against the sky, are not especially inviting specimens of the freaks in which dame Nature occasionally indulges. Yet, and yet, the wonderful atmosphere that bends above and embraces us, is the most marvelous of magicians.” ~Richard J. Hinton, “Over Valley and Mesa,” The Hand-Book to Arizona, 1877

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Within, without — withstand

Religion! What Is It?
by Reginald Heber (1783–1826)

’Tis not to go to church to-day,
To look devout, and seem to pray,
And ere to-morrow’s sun go down,
Be dealing scandal through the town.

Not every sanctimonious face,
Denotes the certain reign of grace;
A phiz, that seems to scowl at sin,
Oft veils hypocrisy within.

’Tis not to mark out duty’s walk,
Or of our own good deeds to talk;
And then to practice secret crime,
And to misspend and waste our time.

’Tis not for sects or creeds to fight,
And call our zeal the rule of right;
When all we wish is, at the best,
To see our church excel the rest...

It grieves to hear an ill report,
And scorns with human woes to sport;
Of others’ deeds it speaks no ill,
But tells of good or else is still...


“I believe the purpose of all major religious traditions is not to construct big temples on the outside, but to create temples of goodness and compassion inside, in our hearts.” ~Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama, c.1996

“I don’t never have any trouble in regulating my own conduct, but to keep other folks’ straight is what bothers me.” ~Josh Billings (1818–1885)

“Many of us believe that wrongs aren’t wrong if it’s done by nice people like ourselves.” ~Jason Rainbow, c.1979

“Our moral theorists seem never content with the normal. Why must it always be a contest between fornication, obesity and laziness, and celibacy, fasting and hard labor?” ~Martin H. Fischer (1879–1962)

“A great deal of what passes for current Christianity consists in denouncing other people’s vices and faults.” ~Henry Williams, Bishop of Carlisle, c.1928

“You would do well to trouble less about the actions of others, and to take a little more pains with your own. One ought to look a long time into one’s self before thinking of condemning others...” ~Molière, c.1666